EMR…Money Well Spent for Physicians?

An entire industry has emerged to meet the growing EMR demands of hospitals and physician providers alike. With so many companies competing for physician practice and hospital contracts how can these providers be sure that they are receiving a product that will result in Medicare incentive payments?

Let us take for example the average family practice physician. He/she can expect to spend over $71,000 on the initial investment in an electronic medical record and almost $12,000 each year after. How will this physician know if the EMR that came at a significant price will satisfy the government’s requirements for an EMR? In short will this system that was intended to benefit his practice in fact be detrimental? http://www.aafp.org/fpm/2002/0400/p57.html

In an effort to help clinical providers validate the EMR company’s claim of meeting governmental requirements to qualify for incentive payments the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT®) was born. An independent nonprofit organization whose mission is to accelerate the adoption of robust, interoperable health information technology, the Commission has been certifying electronic health record technology since 2006 and is approved by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as an Authorized Testing and Certification Body (ONC-ATCB).

Furthermore, the Department of Health and Human Services has developed a website, http://onc-chpl.force.com/ehrcert that contains a comprehensive listing of each EHR that has been certified by an ONC-Authorized Testing and Certification Body (ONC-ATCB) and reported to ONC. Only the product versions that are included on the CHPL are certified under the ONC Temporary Certification Program.

Steps are being taken, both governmentally and in the private sector to make sure EMR companies provide exactly what physicians need. Only time and governmental agency audits will tell if EMR is doing all it has been purported to do.

An entire industry has emerged to meet the growing EMR demands of hospitals and physician providers alike. With so many companies competing for physician practice and hospital contracts how can these providers be sure that they are receiving a product that will result in Medicare incentive payments?

Let us take for example the average family practice physician. He/she can expect to spend over $71,000 on the initial investment in an electronic medical record and almost $12,000 each year after. How will this physician know if the EMR that came at a significant price will satisfy the government’s requirements for an EMR? In short will this system that was intended to benefit his practice in fact be detrimental?

http://www.aafp.org/fpm/2002/0400/p57.html

In an effort to help clinical providers validate the EMR company’s claim of meeting governmental requirements to qualify for incentive payments the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT®) was born. An independent nonprofit organization whose mission is to accelerate the adoption of robust, interoperable health information technology, the Commission has been certifying electronic health record technology since 2006 and is approved by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as an Authorized Testing and Certification Body (ONC-ATCB).

Furthermore, the Department of Health and Human Services has developed a website, http://onc-chpl.force.com/ehrcert that contains a comprehensive listing of each EHR that has been certified by an ONC-Authorized Testing and Certification Body (ONC-ATCB) and reported to ONC. Only the product versions that are included on the CHPL are certified under the ONC Temporary Certification Program.

Steps are being taken, both governmentally and in the private sector to make sure EMR companies provide exactly what physicians need. Only time and governmental agency audits will tell if EMR is doing all it has been purported to do.

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